China Stole US Military Secrets, Now Threat: Mike Pompeo | China Uncensored


It’s the 30th Anniversary of the Tiananmen
Square Massacre
The US Secretary of State says China Stole
US Military Secrets
And what Chinese authorities say is the biggest
risk
for Chinese visitors in the United States
That and more on this week’s China news
headlines.
Welcome to China Uncensored.
I’m Chris Chappell.
This week’s China news headlines.
You know, camera technology has sure improved
over the last, let’s say 30 years.
Consider this grimy old photo from 1989.
You can barely see what’s going on.
But with the new Huawei P30 Pro,
photos become much more accurate!
An image that’s so crystal clear, it’s
invisible.
And that’s not all.
With the P30 Pro’s new “China Dream”
filter,
a pesky message about freedom from tyranny…
Gets much more patriotic.
That banner now says “Go Huawei!”
As it should.
That Huawei photo, by the way,
is a joke that Chinese netizens are passing
around on WeChat.
As US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says,
“Huawei is an instrument of the Chinese
government.”
And the Chinese government can make beautiful
things with it.
Obviously the 30-year anniversary of the Tiananmen
Square Massacre
is big news.
Except in China where it’s no news at all.
And foreign companies are willing to help.
Like one of Reuters news service’s biggest
partners.
Refinitiv is a data firm that operates in
China,
providing financial information.
And citing the legal realities of China blah
blah blah,
they decided to block anything to do with
the Tiananmen Square Massacre
on their data terminals in China.
Somewhat ironically,
that meant also blocking Reuters articles.
According to Reuters,
“Refinitiv took the action to block the
stories last week
after the Cyberspace Administration of China,
which controls online speech,
threatened to suspend the company’s service
in China
if it did not comply.”
“However, many users outside of China
said they could not see the stories.”
Maybe they were all using phones made by Huawei.
Which brings us back to Mike Pompeo.
The US Secretary of State is saying China
stole US secrets
to build up their own military.
Shocking, I know.
Fortunately the US Department of Defense
has come up with a novel solution.
See, a few days ago,
it was reported that the Department of Defense
accidentally bought $20 million dollars worth
of phony military gear
made in China.
But I say, it was no accident.
Because now,
when the Chinese military steals American
technology,
they’ll be stealing back their own stuff
that doesn’t work!
Very art of war.
China has launched a rocket to space from
a cargo ship at sea.
That makes China the first country to fully
own and operate
a floating launch platform for space missions.
Why that’s an advantage, I’m not sure.
Maybe they were inspired by Waterworld.
But the China National Space Administration
said in a statement,
“Launching a rocket from the sea
has the advantages of high flexibility,
good adaptability for specific tasks,
and excellent launch economy.”
Okay, I have no idea what that means.
Maybe when they launch a rocket
from the ancient Chinese territory of the
South China Sea,
wherever it lands also becomes ancient Chinese
territory.
Now like many things made in China,
the idea for the launch platform was actually
stolen.
Back in the late ’90s, the United States,
Norway, Russia, and Ukraine
teamed up to build a sea launch service called…
wait for it…
“Sea Launch.”
But the program was shut down in 2014,
after Russia decided Ukraine was a part of
Russian territory
since ancient times.
Meanwhile in Hong Kong,
thousands of lawyers took to the streets
to protest a proposed extradition law.
That law would allow criminals to be extradited
from Hong Kong to mainland China for the first
time.
People like corrupt Chinese officials and
businesspeople
who have fled to Hong Kong.
But the proposed law has made many Hongkongers
nervous,
since what’s considered a crime in Hong
Kong versus the mainland
can be a little different.
Also there’s the whole lack of rule of law
in mainland China issue.
Now you know things are bad
when the lawyers start protesting in the streets.
Looks kind of like a giant…black parade.
I mean, who died, am I right?
What’s that, Shelley?Oh right, Hong Kong’s
freedoms have died.
How about we talk about the trade war?
Nice simple happy trade war.
According to the International Monetary Fund,
President Trump’s tariffs are having an
impact on China.
“The trade tensions have had an impact,
significant, but in our view,
so far contained.”
Chinese leader Xi Jinping has decided to focus
on the “contained” part.
He said “Looking into the future,
China’s economy bears the supporting conditions
for stable,
healthy and sustainable growth.”
He said that just before he traveled to Russia
to meet Putin,
where Xi said, I kid you not,
“He is my best and bosom friend.
I cherish dearly our deep friendship.”
I mean obviously.
This time last year Xi gave putin a best friends
forever medal.
Oh my gosh, Russia collusion is real!
It’s just China-Russia collusion.
And I’m sure nobody would be interested
in that story.
For the past two years,
the US government has been making it harder
for Chinese students to get visas to study
here.
The concern is potential espionage.
The US government is also making it more restrictive
for Chinese nationals to get work visas
in sensitive fields related to national security,
like the semiconductor industry.
So the Chinese Communist Party has pulled
the classic,
“Well we don’t want to send people to
your stupid country anyway.”
They’ve warned Chinese citizens not the
visit or study in the US,
saying “Students and scholars [should] strengthen
risk assessments
before going abroad to study.”
Specifically, “The Ministry of Culture and
Tourism
warned of threats such as robbery and gun
violence” in America.
Yes, America is dangerous because of all the
criminals with guns!
Whereas China is only dangerous because of
all the soldiers with tanks.
And now it’s time for me to answer a question
from one of you—
a fan who support China Uncensored
with a dollar or more per episode,
by contributing through Patreon.
Largezo asks,
“What actually started the events
leading to the 1989 Tienanmen square massacre?
A protest against corrupt government officials?
Good question!
So it has to do with these two guys,
Hu Yaobang and Zhao Ziyang.
The Paramount leader at the time, Deng Xiaoping
called them his left and right hands.
They were very high ranking officials,
charged with pushing forward Deng’s economic
reforms.
But they were also keen on making political
and social reforms,
like investigating the hidden wealth of other
top officials.
That made them very popular with the average
citizen,
but not so popular with the average high ranking
official.
So other Communist Party members purged Hu
Yaobang in 1987.
And when he died in April 1989,
people showed up in Tiananmen Square to mourn
him.
And then they decided, well, while we’re
here in Tiananmen,
let’s push the democratic reforms that Hu
Yaobang had wanted.
They continued their protest for weeks.
In hindsight, maybe they should have gone
with a different slogan.
The protests spread around the country,
and people were asking for greater economic
and political reforms.
But they were not asking to overthrow the
Chinese Communist Party.
But that’s not how the Communist Party took
it.
Anyway, I also mentioned Zhao Ziyang.
He supported the students,
by telling them to leave the Square for their
own safety.
Bad move.
For that, he got purged, too.
And spent the rest of his life under house
arrest.
And he was replaced with everyone’s
least favorite toad, Jiang Zemin.
And the rest is China Uncensored history.
This is of course the extreme cliff notes
version.
We’ve done several episodes
on the Tiananmen Square Massacre over the
years.
I’ve put links to those episodes below.
Thanks for your question, Largezo.
And thanks to everyone watching!
We could not make this show without your support.
Whether it’s supporting us through Patreon
or just watching and sharing the show
with your friends and family.
So thank you from me
and everyone on the China Uncensored team.
Once again I’m Chris Chappell,
see you next time.

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